Category Archives: Travel

Paris in June, pt. 3

Grand Palais

Grand Palais

Une artiste, Grand Palais

Blue Skies

Blue Skies, Pont Neuf

Place Dauphine

Place Dauphine

Rosé, Le Bar du Caveau

Quai de la Seine

Abbesses

A highlight of the trip–perhaps all of my dozen trips combined–was finally getting to go inside the Grand Palais. Entry was free the weekend I was there, and I’d been longing to stand inside the massive hall, with its iron lattice ceiling, ever since I saw this photo from the turn of the century years ago. It did not disappoint. I spent close to an hour and a half, just wandering from one end to the other, marveling at the vastness of the space. I can’t begin to describe the scale of it. It felt like stepping back in time, and if there’s ever an excuse for me to start fantasizing about life in Belle Époque Paris, this one was as good as any.

Other highlights: buying a 3€ used copy of Daphne du Maurier’s “The Scapegoat” at my new favorite English bookshop in the city, and sitting en terrasse at Place Dauphine with a glass (or two) of rosé and reading. It had been almost four years that I took this photo, and there I was, sitting in that exact spot:

Place Dauphine

Everything comes full circle.

September 7, 2018 / art / photo / Travel / LEAVE A COMMENT

Paris in June, pt. 2

Le Relais Saint-Germain

Peekaboo!

Soper!

Out my window

Coulée verte René-Dumont

Pause au parc

Rue Vivienne

Off duty

Île Saint-Louis

Une chemise

Coucou

This trip was a true vacation, and I fully realize how spoiled that sounds, given that I was just there in February. But that was a work trip; I wrote the entire time. The time before that, in September, I had class three days a week. This trip, I had absolutely no plans. It was a week to clear my head, relax, and, thrillingly, get to know my new camera. I’d bought a secondhand Fuji, lured by its compact size and weight and its true optical viewfinder (I’m a purist). It’s definitely not in the same league as my Canon 6D full-frame, but my shoulder aches after carrying that beast around all day. My 12th trip to Paris seemed like as good a time as any to test it out; it’s not like I haven’t taken these exact photos before, so if the quality was terrible or I couldn’t find my way around the settings as comfortably as with my Canon–I’ve had it for about five years, I could work it in my sleep–it wouldn’t be a total waste.

Thankfully, I think it worked out pretty well! I barely noticed the weight of it in my bag each day, and its discreet size meant I didn’t feel quite as awkward with it slung over my shoulder, or when I pulled it out at a restaurant to snap a photo of my meal. The auto-focus isn’t as fast as my Canon, and sometimes it searches and misses, especially in low light, but it’s a fantastic, true ‘walk around’ camera and I don’t regret buying it (especially since I got it for a third of what it would have cost new). Pas mal, non?

September 4, 2018 / art / photo / Travel / LEAVE A COMMENT / 2

Paris in June, pt. 1 (finally)

73, rue Blanche

Croque

Tuileries

Passerelle Léopold Sédar Senghor

Metro

Jardin du Musée Rodin

Roses Costes

Faire du lèche vitrine

Rue Louis Boilly

I hadn’t been back to Paris in June since 2014, and while you’ll never hear me complain about Paris in the winter (the dark and moody weather makes a perfect contrast against the orange glow of cafe lights) there is something undeniably alluring about the summer there. The sun doesn’t set until close to 11pm, the weather is comfortable (though I had to buy a sweatshirt my first day there. In June.), and I forgot what it was like to not have to regularly duck into a restaurant or shop to thaw out. I guess what this proves is that there really are no bad seasons to visit Paris, and that’s what I tell people then they ask me when they should go. Just go. It rained my whole first day and I had an embarrassing incident on the bus with the RATP transit police (a scam! It’s such a long story, but one which ends with me going to the US Embassy and then giving a police statement at the préfecture in the 8ème, and being reimbursed by my credit card company without question, and all three entities had heard my exact story before from other targeted tourists that same day.) but still, it was home. It is home.

Sun-soaked photos to come, je te jure.

August 31, 2018 / art / photo / Travel / LEAVE A COMMENT / 2

February in Paris, pt. 2

Pont de Bir-Hakeim

Pont de Bir-Hakeim

Place Dauphine

Place Dauphine

A lady & a dog, Notre-Dame

Le Saint-Régis

Crue

Snowflakes on his shoulders

Il neige!

May 23, 2018 / art / photo / Travel / LEAVE A COMMENT / 2

February in Paris, pt. 1

Rue des Abbesses

Les Livres

Boulevard de Clichy

Église Saint-Sulpice

Église Saint-Sulpice

Rue Ferou

Jardin du Luxembourg

San Fransisco Bookshop

Rue Cler

Les Roses

May 21, 2018 / art / photo / Travel / Comments Off on February in Paris, pt. 1

Mon Appart

Villa Dancourt

Mon appart

Mon appart

My home

Mon appart

Mon appart

Mon appart

In September, I had the good fortune of finding perhaps the most perfect apartment I’ve ever stayed in. Located a block from both rue des Abbesses and rue des Martyrs, the location could not be beat, and the space itself lived up to all of my exacting standards (big windows! a non-handheld shower! original crown moldings!). I was lucky enough to call the apartment home for two weeks then, and even luckier to be able to return to it at the end of February of this year. It was in that living room, at that table, that I finished my novel. (I have so much to tell you!) There was a severe cold snap in February while I was there, and the apartment became my warm, cozy cocoon, providing me with enough reasons to stay in and write.

The owner and I became fast friends in September, and kept in touch on WhatsApp ever since. She graciously invited me back this winter, and I’ll be going back in June. (Surprise!) She even offered it up for the entire month of July and part of August, and you guys, I deserve a medal for not succumbing to the temptation to faff off for five weeks. It quickly became “my” apartment, and it’s felt like home in a way that no other in Paris apartment has since 2014.

I can’t wait to be back.

May 18, 2018 / Travel / Comments Off on Mon Appart

September in Paris, pt. 4

Dusk Montmartre

Petit Déj, Café de Flore

Bench, Jardin du Luxembourg

Bench in the shade

More leaves

Musée Nissim Camondo

Le Rostand Chat

Rue Dancourt

Leaves

Rue des Abbesses

Salut!

Chapelle expiatoire

Chairs, Jardin du Luxembourg

That Paris exists, and anyone could choose to live anywhere else in the world will always be a mystery to me.

I am so lucky to have Paris. France, more generally, because I can’t forget about La Ciotat. This trip was unlike any other for me, a combination of the weather and the time of year and the foliage and the southern coast and my 18-hour French immersion course. All of it was so good. I stepped out of my comfort zone in a big way this trip, and was rewarded for it. There were so many highlights it’s hard to pick a single thing, but the memory I keep coming back to over and over is sitting in the Jardin du Luxembourg, on a bench in the early afternoon, with the leaves crunching underfoot and rustling overhead, doing my French homework. (once a nerd, always a nerd)

So it goes without saying: I really miss Paris. When I’m not there, the distance feels insufferable, insurmountable, like I’m chasing a forgotten dream that’s somehow always just outside my grasp. Could it have all been real? The air, the sounds, the light, the steady calm that settles over me the moment my feet touch French soil? It’s not just that I’ve fallen in love with Paris–that happened a long time ago–it’s that I’ve now fallen in with Paris, matched its step, its rhythm, its secrets. Instead of being consumed by longing when I’m away, I’ve turned instead to gratitude. How lucky am I, to love Paris this much? To love the city so much it’s changed the fundamental makeup of my DNA, altered me irrevocably? Paris will always be there, and it will always be there for me. Everyone has their own Paris, if they’re lucky enough. I’m lucky enough to have mine.

November 7, 2017 / art / photo / Travel / LEAVE A COMMENT / 1

September in Paris, pt. 3

Art store window

La Tour Eiffel

Classic Haussmann

La Tour Eiffel

Notre-Dame

Wildlife, Seine

Île Saint-Louis

The reading hour, Avenue Trudaine

Avenue Trudaine

Baguette, Rue des Abbesses

Pause au parc

Leaves

Fleuriste, Place de Furstenberg

Sometimes words feel unnecessary. I’ll have something to say on my next post, when I finally (!) wrap up the photos from this trip (you know, just over a month after going. Remember the days when people, myself included, blogged every single day??). Until then…

October 31, 2017 / art / photo / Travel / LEAVE A COMMENT / 1

September in La Ciotat, pt. 2

Parc Mugel, La Ciotat

Parc Mugel, La Ciotat

Parc Mugel, La Ciotat

Parc Mugel, La Ciotat

Bzzz. Parc Mugel, La Ciotat

Anse du Petit Mugel

Reading in the shade, Anse du Petit Mugel

Plage Capucins, La Ciotat

Plage Capucins, La Ciotat

Plage Capucins, La Ciotat

Plage Capucins, La Ciotat

Plage Capucins, La Ciotat

Making friends with the locals, Vieux Port

You know me well enough by now to know I’m not a nature person. I prefer concrete, crowds, and the noise of the city. I find the silence of nature unnerving, suspicious even. Don’t get me wrong, I enjoy brief jaunts in small doses, but my comfort zone is certainly 100& urban. The same is true for beaches; I’m not a beach person. I don’t like the sun, the sand, the idea of laying somewhere for hours that isn’t an air conditioned room. I’m not really an outdoors person in any sense of the word, in case you hadn’t guessed.

So you’d think a town bumping right up against the Mediterranean sea, whose biggest draw was that it has both grand beaches and a majestic nature park with rocky calanques at either end, wouldn’t be a place I’d fall head over heels in love with. La Ciotat proved me wrong. I went to the beach both days and the calanques at the foot of Parc du Mugel, where I spread a blanket under a tree and read in the shade for hours. The water was remarkable: crystal clear and azur blue, and refreshingly crisp but not too cold (people were swimming!). The great thing about going to a beach resort town off-season was how few people there were; I know if I’d gone even a month earlier, at the end of August, it would have been impossible to have an entire rocky inlet to myself (something that normally would have freaked me out, but in these circumstances made me feel like I’d discovered a secret portal to heaven).

I’d seen pictures of Parc du Mugel and the calanques before I left, but nothing prepared me for it in real life. Photos can’t even do it justice. The air, the breeze, the sound of the water against the rocks, the complete isolation from noise and people, and, most importantly, the color of the water. I read, I stared at the sea, I napped, I lay there doing nothing. It helped that it was late September and the temperatures were in the low 70s. But by late afternoon on my second day, I had to fight to peel myself off of the rocks and get on the train back to Paris. I could’ve happily stayed there forever.

And the beach! It turns out, I don’t hate the beach, I hate American beaches, with the powdery, suffocating sand, the overwhelming smell of brine, and the filthy water. (Do you know how much trash I saw in La Ciotat? None. I saw zero trash, at the beach, in the water, in the park, or in the town itself.) The beaches in La Ciotat were made of teensy little sand pebbles, not grit, and the water was clean and smelled like fresh salt–like a candle, an almost artificial approximation of how a beach should smell. If you grow up thinking the beaches in New Jersey are representative of all beaches, no wonder you detest going to the beach. To not have to pluck sand from your bodily crevices for a full day after going swimming, did you even know such a luxury existed? Get thee to the south of France! Where everything, including the sand, is better.

My trip was over all too quickly, and by 5:30 I was in Marseille boarding a train back to Paris. If I didn’t love Sundays in Paris so much, I would’ve stayed an extra day. Could’ve, easily. Even though there isn’t much of anything to do in La Ciotat (and a character laments that fact early on in my book), that’s kind of the whole point. I felt more relaxed after a single afternoon reading by the water than any yoga or meditation class back home. There was something centering and restorative about that town, and I’m already dying to go back.

October 20, 2017 / art / photo / Travel / Comments Off on September in La Ciotat, pt. 2

September in La Ciotat, pt. 1

Gare de La Ciotat

Vieux Port, La Ciotat

La Ciotat

Ladies of La Ciotat

La Ciotat

La Ciotat

Place Sadi Carnot, La Ciotat

Weathered, La Ciotat

Graffiti, La Ciotat

La Ciotat

La Ciotat

Rue des Poilus, La Ciotat

Calanque du Grand Mugel

I want to tell you all about La Ciotat.

Four years ago, I closed my eyes and pointed at a map of France, aiming along the southern coast between Marseille and Monaco. I needed a small seaside town that wasn’t well-known, not overly touristy, a little less glitzy and moneyed that the obvious resort towns like Cannes and Nice. Somewhere working-class French locals went every summer. I ended up in La Ciotat, approximately 20km east of Marseille, near Cassis. Famous for being the town where the Lumiere brothers made one of the first motion pictures–of a train pulling in the station–and the birthplace of pétanque–French bocce–La Ciotat is a quaint, sleepy commune with all the charm of the Côte d’Azur, but little present-day notoriety. In other words, it was a perfect place to open my novel. Thanks to Google Maps, I was able to craft four or five chapters in the town; how hard is it to write about two characters spending afternoons at the beach when you can visit the beach in Street View, even if it’s thousands of miles away?

After a whirlwind 30 hour trip in real life, I can safely say I got it mostly right.

On my first Friday in Paris, I took an early morning Uber to Gare de Lyon, where I boarded a train to Marseille. It was raining that morning in Paris, a rarity this trip, but as the train pulled further and further south, the clouds cleared and the sun started shining. Three hours later (after a nap and some quality reading time), we disembarked at Saint-Charles station to balmy weather and a thick, glorious sunshine unlike anything I’d seen before. The light truly is different down there, and even someone as sun-averse as myself, I had a hard time resisting its glow. I bought a ticket for a local train headed to Hyères, and within half an hour I’d arrived in La Ciotat. (Side-note: no one ever checked my ticket on the local train, to or from Marseille, so I basically donated €8 to SNCF out of the kindness of my heart.)(Side-note #2: the French rail system is a thing of beauty and a model of convenience.)

All of my research and Google Earth stalking hadn’t prepared me for just how cute this place is; I couldn’t handle it. The bus into the center of town–which cost a whopping 90 cents for an all-day pass–played Stromae and Keane (!!), and as it rounded a corner and I got my first view of the glittering Mediterranean water in the early afternoon sun, I gasped out loud. Being late September, the town was mostly empty of tourists, leaving only locals around and all of the restaurant terraces facing the sea empty. La Ciotat is small, I can’t stress that enough; I walked from one end of the waterfront to the other in about 40 minutes. One the north side there are long beaches, and all the way at the south is a giant nature reserve, Parc du Mugel, with calanques and rocky inlets with shrubby swimming holes, and tons of fishing boats docked in the Vieux Port in the middle of town. It’s decidedly working-class and unfussy, there’s graffiti and the paint on every building is delightfully chippy. The age of the local population averaged about 60, from my brief study, and the pace there is just different, slower, more relaxed. Melted, even.

I stayed right at the end of the Vieux Port, overlooking boats bobbing in the dock, and the long pier that marks the end of the city center. At the end of the pier is a two-story dance club called Sûr Les Quais, which features a different theme and DJ every night, and also features prominently in the beginning of my book. Since it was the off-season and the hotel was empty, they upgraded my room at check-in, and so I was able to write on my large balcony the next morning, staring directly at the club. It was the eeriest thing, being in a place that for so long has felt fictional, alive only on the page for me. I half-expected my characters to come stumbling out of the club at 4am–when the town finally went to sleep that night!–and call for me at my window. (Does that sound psychotic?)

For dinner that night, I ate along the water at a crêpe restaurant, and brought a book with me. I’d started reading Julia Child’s “My Life in France” on the plane to Paris–I like themed reading–and she had been casually narrating my trip thus far, describing Paris in September as the weather changed, etc. As I tucked into my dessert, I was about 200 pages in when Julia’s husband Paul gets reassigned to a posting in Marseille. “Oh!” I thought. “How funny. Now she’s following me to the south of France.” Not a paragraph later, she and Paul take a drive along the coast with a packed picnic lunch, and stop in La Ciotat for the afternoon. My eyes bulged out of my head. There I was, sitting in La Ciotat, reading about Julia Child sitting in La Ciotat, a town I’d never heard of before randomly picking it off a map years before. Spooky!

The whole experience in the town felt like that, honestly. Like I’d made this place up and it had come to life on its own, existing exactly the way I’d written it, and only for me. To say I’d fallen in love would be an understatement.

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October 17, 2017 / art / photo / Travel / LEAVE A COMMENT / 6