Monthly Archives: January 2017

Dress Your Desk

Cynthia Rowley for Staples

I’m not usually a fan of designer lines for chain stores. I remember the Moschino for Target collaboration from a few years ago actually started fights in the parking lot and in the aisles between women hoarding towels and plates and notebooks emblazoned with the brand’s iconic stripes. People lined up around the block for the Balmain event at H&M. As nice as some of the pieces looked, they were still made by H&M, and why would I want to spend money (more money than usual, actually, for H&M) on clothes that would invariably fall apart in three washes?

But as far as diffusion lines go, the new Cynthia Rowley for Staples totally won me over. I’m much more easily distracted by beautiful desk and writing accessories than I ever will be by clothes. Look at all that moody floral goodness! A gold stapler! When was the last time you actually stapled anything? Doesn’t matter, it’s gold, in the cart it goes. I cracked and bought a two-pocket folder to use for my French homework (#nerdalert), which cost me a whopping $1.60 with tax. And I didn’t even have to wait in line for it, because Staples lets you order online and pick up in store 1hr later. Pas mal!

January 20, 2017 / home design / LEAVE A COMMENT / 2

2016 in Books

2016 in books

My year in books:

Book Goal: 30
Books Read: 34
Books Set in/About Paris: 13 (three less than last year)
Books Borrowed from the Library: 11
Favorite Book(s): “A Separate Peace” by John Knowles, “32 Yolks” by Eric Ripert, “Hotel Pastis” by Peter Mayle, and “Read Joan” by Jennie Rooney
Least Favorite(s): Oof, I read some stinkers last year. “Maestra” leads the pack as possibly the worst thing I have ever read, ever. I’ve read ingredients lists that were more well-crafted and intelligent. But there are some other joyless slogs, too: “The Girl in the Spider’s Web” (the Lisbeth Salander series needed to die when Stieg Larsson did), “Murder in the Marais” (I actually thought this was a bad translation from French, given how poor the writing was. It was not.), “The Fall Guy” (what saddens me most about this one is that the author, who can’t write, teaches writing at a college level).
Longest Book: “The Greater Journey”, by David McCullough.
Shortest Book: “A Separate Peace” by John Knowles
Funniest: “Me Talk Pretty One Day” by David Sedaris. I was the last person on earth to read this one, I’m sure.
Saddest: “When Breath Becomes Air” by Paul Kalanithi
Books from Book of the Month: 3
Prettiest Covers: “The Spy” by Paolo Coelho and “Paris in Winter” by David Coggins (the latter was filled with his illustrations, too)
Most Overrated: “The Woman in Cabin 10” by a mile. A weak copy of “Girl on the Train,” which was a weak copy of “Gone Girl.” And it was written at a sixth grade reading level, max.

You can read all of my reviews for these books over on Goodreads (let’s be friends!). Are you doing a reading challenge in 2017? I’m aiming for 30 this year again. We’re about to enter the most unintelligent administration in this nation’s history, so I consider this year’s challenge a moral imperative. Read, read, read, kiddos.

January 17, 2017 / read / watch / LEAVE A COMMENT / 2

Paris in December, pt. 5: Saint-Germain-en-Laye & Montmartre

Château de Saint-Germain-en-Laye

Picasso à Vélo

Paris in the Distance

Saint-Germain-en-Laye

Saint-Germain-en-Laye

No. 3

That Way to Paris

Old Books

Saint-Germain-en-Laye

View from Sacré-Cœur

Sinking House

Man & Pigeon

Square de la Rue Burq

Photobooth

Dinner for One, Le Cepage Montmartrois

Eiffel Tower from Montmartre

On our last full day before we flew out, I did something that I’ve done only once before, several visits ago: I went outside of Paris. Well, just barely. We took the RER A train from Opera to the end of the line, to the adorable town of Saint-Germain-en-Laye. It was a quick half an hour train ride, if that, which is about as far as we could reasonably go if we wanted to be back in the late afternoon. The main attraction in town, and the first thing you spot coming up from the train station, is the imposing château de Saint-Germain-en-Laye. The sprawling gardens, manicured that surround the castle were a bit soggy the day we were there but the vista at the end of the cliff provided a view straight back into the city, including a teensy Eiffel Tower in the distance. We spent the morning walking around the town, shopped at a Christmas market in the town square, and had two of the most delicious crêpes we’ve ever had at a small, packed restaurant off the main strip. Composer Claude Debussy was born there, and the tiny, two-story Visitors Information office housed in the building where he lived with his wife and daughter doubles as a small museum to his life (think one room, free admission, all of five minutes to visit). If I had to think of a word to describe Saint-Germain-en-Laye, it would be “cute.” It was just so, so cute. Five or six hours is the perfect amount of time to spend there, and it only cost €16 for both of us, round trip, to get there. It was a nice change of pace and while I wouldn’t have planned it on my own, I’m glad Jamal suggested it.

We got back to Paris around 4, and headed straight for Montmartre. Given that it was our last night, we had made reservations at our favorite restaurant in the neighborhood (and, actually, the world), Le Cepage Montmartrois on Rue Caulaincourt. We went to Sacré-Cœur, visited our old haunts, our favorite hidden park on Rue Burq, and stopped into about four seemingly identical pop-up shops with the same aesthetic. (Montmartre is becoming hipsterized at an alarming rate.) I’ve made no secret of my favoritism in the past, but it bears repeating: I love Montmartre. I love it. It was my home briefly, and it’s where I keep coming back to. I’ll always have a soft spot for it, for my favorite boulangerie on Abbesses that makes the best baguette, the traiteur on Rue Lepic with the best rôti, and the cheap crêpe window right at the corner of Lepic and Clichy with the beautiful girl who always gave me an extra dollop of nutella with a wink. Parts of the neighborhood are tacky and overtouristed (helllooo Place du Tertre) but I still love it, warts and all. It was the best place to spend our last night.

And that concludes the Paris photos, kiddos! Thank you for being patient and putting up with all of them, as I’m sure some seem repetitive from trips past. I promise I have other, non-Paris posts scheduled in the coming days & weeks.

But, uh, you’re going to have to deal with this all over again, because I’m going back in 66 days. Ha!

January 13, 2017 / art / photo / Travel / LEAVE A COMMENT / 4

Paris in December, pt. 4

Butte-aux-Cailles

Butte-aux-Cailles

Butte-aux-Cailles

Vintage Car

Musée Jacquemart-André

Musée Jacquemart-André

Service du No. 7

Rue Rembrandt

Café

Pierre Chretien

Antique Books

Tabac St. Philippe Rue La Boétie

Ladurée

Café, Rue des Martyrs

We spent the last half of one waning afternoon in the 13eme, the southeastern arrondissement settled high on a hill. The architecture is different, there are so many charming, non-Haussmann houses lining twisting, cobbled streets, and there’s a feeling there that you’re not even in Paris anymore, that you’ve left the map and the century. Location aside, that sounds a lot like Montmartre, doesn’t it? Or, Montmartre five years ago, anyway. While you’ll never hear me speak ill of mon quartrier, the authentic, non-touristy pockets of the 18eme are harder to eke out these days, as people seem to have gotten the memo that Montmartre is amazing. The 13eme feels distinctly local, given that there are virtually no tourist attractions (no major museums or shops or destinations). People live there. It’s wildly affordable (We know because we stop at every real estate office we pass, regardless of what city we’re in) and after just an afternoon, spent wandering and gazing and stopping for tea, we were settled: next time we’re staying there. (I like to think further ahead, and couldn’t help but daydream about how much apartment I could get for my money, long term).

The next day, my friend John’s urging, we visited the Musée Jacquemart-André. To say it’s beautiful would be an understatement. An old hotel particulier turned museum to We walked over to Ternes and had lunch at an Italian restaurant, before splitting up and heading our separate ways for the afternoon: Jamal back to Martyrs to shop for dinner, and me to Louis Vuitton & Ladurée, two tasks I didn’t mind undertaking on my own. I’ve always been comfortable on my own, but there’s something about this city that encourages it, how the tables upstairs at the Laudrée on Rue Royale are just big enough for two people, but don’t make a solo diner look alone. I got caught in a rainstorm on my way home, and stopped for cover in the two bookstores on Rue de Rivoli before heading to the metro at Concorde. I walked into our apartment in the 9eme to a tiny Parisian kitchen overflowing with scents and steaming pans; Jamal made chicken and shallots, with lentils and roasted potatoes. Not a bad way to end the day.

January 10, 2017 / art / photo / Travel / LEAVE A COMMENT / 8

Paris in December, pt. 3

Rue des Martyrs

Beurre

Metro, Place de la Madeleine

Ladurée Window

Rue Saint-Honoré

Place Vendôme

Woman, Rue Saint-Honoré

Sad Balloon, Rue de Valois

Palais-Royal

Rue de Temple

Falafel, Rue des Rosiers

Chez Marianne, Rue des Hospitalières Saint-Gervais

Rue Saint-Antoine

Sweet Pup

Rue Saint-Paul

Happy New Year! I try not to make resolutions, because I inevitably break them (going through a round of Invisalign last year was finally what stopped me from biting my nails, after 15 years of resolving at midnight on the 1st to do it), but this year I decided to focus on being the Best Version of Me, in whatever form that entailed. It’s kind of vague and open to interpretation, which means I technically can’t fail. Obviously, I am the best version of myself when I am writing, which means I need to blog here more often than the measly once a week (at best!) I was managing before. Four days into the new year (and almost a month since I left for Paris) and I’m just getting around to it. Baby steps!

Another beautifully sunny day spent in Paris. Walking around the Rue des Martyrs Sunday markets, wandering to Madeleine and down the Rue Saint-Honoré, with a stop to circle the Palais-Royal gardens, before heading all the way to E. Dehillerin (closed, as it was Sunday), stopping at Les Halles and marveling over the newly opened gardens and gigantic shopping mall (Jamal had just been to Johannesburg, and was especially excited at Jardin de Nelson Mandela; I lost my mind in the Lego store over the replica of Notre Dame), and eventually making our way to the Marais for falafel and a tour of the Village de Saint-Paul Christmas markets, a winding, hidden maze of connected courtyards south of the Rue Saint-Antoine. Our day didn’t even stop there, as we hopped on the metro at Pont Marie and headed south to an arrondissement neither of us had ever been to previously, but those photos will have to wait for another day. I’m exhausted just recounting the amount of walking we did this day. But with skies like that, what other choice did we have?

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January 5, 2017 / art / photo / Travel / LEAVE A COMMENT